English: DEERWOOD, Md. (Feb. 7, 2009) Lt. j.g....

English: DEERWOOD, Md. (Feb. 7, 2009) Lt. j.g. Gina Shaw treats shin splints by wrapping her leg in ice after her 8 Kilometer run after competing in the 2009 Armed Forces Cross Country Championship. The women’s cross-country team finished second behind the Air Force. (U.S. Navy photo by Mass Communication Specialist 2nd Class Jhi L. Scott/Released) (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

A common complaint among runners is Shin Splints.  In all honesty, this type of injury happens to more than just runners.  Anyone who has a mild to major increase in activity level is susceptible to shin splints. Shin splints (medically known as Medial Tibial Distress Syndrome) can limit the amount of activity a person can do.  If you have ever had shin splints before, you know exactly what I am talking about.  The pain is excruciating!  So now that the summer is coming to an end, maybe you are trying to increase your amount of activity before the clouds and storms come in representing the change in seasons.

Some factors that increase your risk to shin splints are:

  • Improper footwear
  • Overpronation of the foot/ankle
  • Muscular weakness
  • Muscular tightness
  • Decrease joint mobility
  • Poor training quality/form
  • High foot arches

I am sure that everyone can fit into this list in at least one category.  I know that I fit into at least two fo them.  Does that mean you will get shin splints?  No!  Does it mean you should address pain in the front of your lower leg (shin) if you have it?  Yes, of course!  Here are a few tips to help avoid shin splints

  • Try to stay on softer surfaces for running
  • Replace running shoes around 300-400 miles
  • Limit distance increases to 10% or less each week
  • Include lower impact activities (cycling, elliptical, rowing, swimming, etc.)
  • Stretch the calf muscles (gastrocnemius and soleus)

If you do get shin splints, Advantage PT therapists can help get you back to full training faster!!  Email us with any questions (Office@AdvantageSportsTherapy.com)

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